Tag Archives: Leadership

Tips For Military Veterans To Have An Effective Career Fair

This Content Provided Courtesy of USAA.

career fair 3

Planning for an effective military to civilian transition is one of the most vital things to do for an effective career, family, and financial transition.  A job fair also known as a career fair is one of those steps.  Here are some tips how to have an effective and rewarding career fair.

 

1.     Arrive Early, Hydrated, and Fed.  Job fairs start early.  Arrive early to get a place in line and a close parking spot

2.     Dress for The Job You Want.  Plan to attend a job fair in professional and conservative business attire – a jacket, tie, dress shoes, and dress slacks.  It is tempting to wear your uniform, but a professional employer wants to be able to see you in their organization, not as a soldier, sailor, marine, or airmen.  Finally, impeccable personal dress is a way to standout.  Finally, wear comfortable shoes, you will do a lot of walking.

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3.     Have a Plan.  Create a personal plan for the companies that you want to meet with and have a personalized cover letter and resume for each of these companies.  This way, you have a personalized card, cover letter, and resume for each company when you speak to them.  This amount of preparation and personalization makes a substantial difference.

4.     Be Prepared to Interview.  Be ready and able to have a 30-60-minute interview with a company.  If you make a great first impression, the company may want to interview right on the spot.  Use the STARS format to answer interview questions.

a.     Situation, Task, Action, Result, Skills (STARS)

b.     Situation:  Describe the context within which you performed a job or faced a challenge at work.

c.      Task: Describe your responsibility in that situation.

d.     Action: Describe how you completed the task or endeavored to meet the challenge. Focus on what you did, rather than what your team, boss, or coworker did.

e.     Result: Finally, explain the outcomes or results generated by the action taken.

f.       Skills: Skills you used to be successful – includes both hard (technical) skills and soft skills (leadership, teaching, etc.).

g.     Create 6-10 sentence answers to frequent questions on leadership, improvements, cost savings, and how you learned a new skill.

5.     Attend the Classes.  Career fairs are often filled with classes on resume reviews by HR professionals, panels of employers, and other resources to help in a career change.  Take advantage and network during these training opportunities.

caREER FAIR

6.     Have a Follow Up Plan.  When you meet with the companies, ask when you can follow up for more information, an interview, and get phone numbers and interviews for the follow up.

7.     A Career Fair Is Only One Way to Find a Job.  Don’t expect a career fair to be your entire answer to secure employment.  Continue to network, have personal interviews, and contact companies for other opportunities.  Remember, your goal is not one, but multiple job offers to be successful.

 

Resources to Support an Effective Military to Civilian Transition:

  1. 5 Keys to a Smoother Military Transition – Great Advice to Succeed By @USAA – http://bit.ly/2rI3qKT
  2. After Service: 3 Routes to a Civilian Career – Solid Military to Civilian Transition Advice By @USAA – http://bit.ly/2q8QzAg
  3. Create a Military Transition Fund to Have a Successful Military to Civilian Transition – http://bit.ly/2qMqrhB
  4. USAA Employment Tools to Help Translate Military Skills to Civilian Jobs – USAA Members Only (Free to Join) – http://bit.ly/2q2zsUF
  5. USAA INSIGHT: 3 Ways to Ease Your Shift from Military Service to Civilian Life From @USAA – http://bit.ly/2qMoz8x
  6. USAA Leaving the Military Guide – Advice & Support for a Smooth Transition – USAA Members Only (Free to Join) – http://bit.ly/2rI53Iu
  7. USAA Military Separation Assessment Tool for Financial Planning – USAA Members Only (Free to Join) – http://bit.ly/2q8R8tS
  8. USAA Military Separation Checklist Tool for Planning Your Military to Civilian Transition – USAA Members Only (Free to Join) – bit.ly/2q2RGp5
  9. USAA News – Member’s Easy Military Transition? He Credits Education and Planning – http://bit.ly/2qOdMJc

 

Happy 242nd Birthday To The US Army

Happbirthday22y 242nd Birthday To The US Army

This Content Courtesy of USAA.

June 14, 2017 marks the 242nd Birthday of the United States Army. The US Army is the oldest military service (besting the US Navy by just a few months)! Below are some of the traditions, missions, and values that define the US Army as a military service.

Army Birthday Traditions. Every US Army unit celebrates, remembers, and recognizes the US Army birthday in some way. There can be unit formation runs, Army Band concerts, military balls, formal dinners, or a cup of coffee and a piece of cake — cut with a sword or bayonet, of course. The Army Birthday is a time when everyone in the US Army, US Army National Guard, US Army Reserve, US Army Civilians, US Army Veterans, and family members pause, reflect, and join together to recognize all that the US Army has done and is doing.

Mission of The US Army. The U.S. Army’s mission is to fight and win our Nation’s wars by providing prompt, sustained land dominance across the full range of military operations and spectrum of conflict in support of combatant commanders.

The US Army Values: There are seven US Army Values that create a great personal reminder of the combined value of performance, ethics, loyalty, and courage to complete assigned tasks.

  1. LOYALTY — Bearing true faith and allegiance is a matter of believing in and devoting yourself to something or someone.
  2. DUTY — Duty means being able to accomplish tasks as part of a team. The work of the U.S. Army is a complex combination of missions, tasks and responsibilities — all in constant motion.
  3. RESPECT — Treat people as they should be treated. Respect is what allows us to appreciate the best in other people. Respect is trusting that all people have done their jobs and fulfilled their duty.
  4. SELFLESS SERVICE — Put the welfare of the nation, the Army and your subordinates before your own. The basic building block of selfless service is the commitment of each team member to go a little further, endure a little longer, and look a little closer to see how he or she can add to the effort.
  5. HONOR — Honor is a matter of carrying out, acting, and living the values of respect, duty, loyalty, selfless service, integrity and personal courage in everything you do.
  6. INTEGRITY — Do what’s right, legally and morally. Integrity is a quality you develop by adhering to moral principles.
  7. PERSONAL COURAGE — Face fear, danger or adversity (physical or moral). Personal courage has long been associated with our Army.

SOURCE: US ARMY Values, https://www.army.mil/values/index.html

Get to Know More About the US Army:

Other Military Service Birthdays:

  • US Army — June 14, 1775
  • US Navy — October 13, 1775
  • US Marine Corps — November 10, 1775
  • US Coast Guard — August 4, 1790
  • US Air Force — September 18, 1947

Please share your stories of US Army Birthday’s past and present and how you celebrated the day!

Related Posts:

  1. Lessons in Appreciating Diversity from World War II
  2. Teach Your Boss About the Military for National Guard and Reserve Members
  3. How Military Strategy Can Help Your Career Strategy

Soft Military Skills That Deliver Hard Results for Military Veteran Careers

Translating and applying military skills sets to post-military careers is an invaluable, essential, and vital steps for military veterans to have the best opportunity for career success following military service.  Leadership, Coaching, Training, and finding Solutions to problems are only a few of the ways to add value.  The way to get excited, engaged, and successful in your new civilian career is to leverage and employ your hard-learned military skills in your new civilian career.

US Air Force Engineers

                      US Air Force Engineers

Soft Military Skill For Civilian Career Success #1 – Help Your Boss Define Success.  In the military, as junior leaders, we were used to helping advice, assisting, and developing our military commanders in their professional duties.  Key to this development was helping them determine the description and definition of a successful military operation.  In the civilian world, some leaders are extremely protective of their professional position and may resent the ideas of a subordinate helping them define success.  To help leaders overcome their fear, start with a small project and show how you can define the success.  This is a small impact and powerful example that shows your boss what can be done without appearing to threaten their authority.

Soft Military Skill For Civilian Career Success #2 – Train Your Team To Excel At Their Current (and Future) Jobs.  Another military skill that works great for the civilian workplace is training others to do their jobs better and how to do your job.  Often times, people believe that by not teaching others how to perform their job, they preserve their position.  However, by not training a replacement, you confine yourself to your current position because you cannot be replaced.  Training, developing, educating, and improving your team to perform their jobs better and how to do your job makes them better at their own jobs, makes your team better, and makes your team motivated because you are demonstrating how they can succeed in their careers.

Soft Military Skill For Civilian Career Success #3 – Ensure Life Outside of Work Is Good.  A classic military job of the Squad Leader or Section Leader was to check on Soldiers outside of work, in the barracks, and their home off base.  The belief was that if a person was having trouble outside of work, then how they could perform well while at work.  This applies equally in the civilian workplace.  Most workers want to keep their work and home life private, which is fine.  Inquiring about how their children are doing, their spouse, and the general activities of their home life is a great way to show that you care without being to obtrusive.  In addition, giving employees time off for major life events and personal emergencies, as long as it is not over used, is a great way to demonstrate that you care personally about them and their success.

Soft Military Skill For Civilian Career Success #4 – Create, Test, and Offer Solutions for Problems Then Implement.  Another great military skill set is when problem identification, initiative and execution intersect.  This is when people identify problems, create a solution, test to make sure it works, and then implement the solution all with their own initiative.  This discipline to creativity, innovation, and initiative is what makes military and civilian teams great.  Again, many civilian bosses can be uncomfortable with this initiative, but it has great value to a business and to customer satisfaction.  Start with small problems, solve this effectively, and move onto larger challenges.

Soft skills from the military combine initiative, leadership, problem definition, idea creation, innovative solutions, and effective execution.  Some civilian bosses make time to become comfortable with these concepts, but all civilian leaders will find them effective and the right task to perform to make customers satisfied and create a profitable business that customers want to use repeatedly.

THIS ARTICLE RE-PUBLISHED COURTESY OF USAA.  ORIGINAL PUBLISHED HERE.

Just Published on USAA – How To Build a Military Diversity Group At Your Company

Company Employee Resource Groups (ERG’s), Employee Affinity Groups (EAG) and employee network groups are well established in most businesses today. ERG’s consist of different ethnicities, different genders, and different sexual orientations.  The purpose of ERG’s is to simultaneously advance the careers of their members and the performance and the well-being of the company they are employed at.  ERG’s help the company and they help the company’s employees.

diversity

Employee Resource Groups began to slowly populate across corporations large and small over the past two to three decades.   Military Veteran ERG’s or Military Veteran affinity groups began about a decade ago and have taken off over the past three to five years.  There are a number of ways to establish, build, and grow a military veteran ERG at your company.

 

Here are Five Ways to Build a Military Veteran ERG at your Company

 

#1 – Meet with Existing ERG’s. One of the best ways to establish a military veteran ERG in your company is to meet and learn from existing ERG’s in your company.  Most companies have a fairly complex and time-consuming administrative process to justify, approve, and create a new ERG.  Learning from and following the lessons from those that have already created and validated an ERG is the best way to follow through.  An additional benefit is that when existing ERG’s support and recommend the formation of a new ERG for military veterans, it makes the process easier.

 

#2 – Create Content Focused on Career Advancement. To build membership quickly, offering content based on how to advance and improve careers is one of the most appropriate and asked about content for ERG members.  Content that improves interview skills, helps members learn about other departments, content that creates mentor-mentee relationships for personal improvement, and resume workshops are increasingly in demand.  Finally, a way to expand value throughout the company is to offer career workshops to all ERG member groups, not just military veteran ERG members.  Sharing content with other ERG’s promotes the military concept of teamwork and improvement.

 

#3 – Tell the Value of Military Skills for Business Through History. As a rule, nearly everyone loves learning about military history.  World War II is an area of high interest that has a lot of content potential that translates easily from military history into business and leadership lessons.  The Red Ball Express, a US Army African-American logistical unit that provided critical supplies during the Battle of the Bulge counter attacks, tells the story of teamwork, leadership by example, the critical importance of logistics, and the value of training.  These business lessons related through the stories of the Red Ball Express during World War II show the lessons of business from history, the value that diversity brings to create high performing teams, and educates employees on a critical period of US history.

 

#4 – Translate Military Skills Into Business Use. Military veterans transitioning into a company or Guard / Reserve military personnel returning from deployment all need assistance translating and applying their military skills to meet business challenges.  There are immediate ways to apply military safety procedures to make a company’s operations safer, ways the military contracts for services and receives bids for new business  that a company can use for improved purchasing, or how a military coaching session of the Task, Condition, Standard, and Observed Performance can be used to improve employees.  There are an immense number of uses for military skills in business – a military veteran ERG helps all military members benefit from military skill sets.

 

#5 – Make a Place for All Employees. One of the best ways to expand and build an ERG is to make a dedicated and unique place for non-military veterans.  There are a large number of employees that want to learn about the military, help military veterans transition effectively, and learn military skill sets they can apply to their careers.  Have a place for non-military veterans in the military veteran ERG to expand the membership base and employee advocates for the military veteran ERG.

 

Military Veteran Employee Resource Groups expand military veteran skill sets, help retain and attract military veteran employees, and bring new skills to make the company better. Military Veteran ERG’s are a critical business asset to help a company succeed.

 

THIS ARTICLE REPUBLISHED COURTESY OF USAA.  ORIGINAL ARTICLE IN USAA MEMBER COMMUNITY HERE.